Week 2

Here are some highlights for leading into Week 2 🙂

  • The Miracle Morning by Hal Elrod

    The author’s first morning routine was 1 hour long, with ten minutes each of: silence/meditating, reading, affirmations, visualization, gratitude journaling, and exercise.

  • The Miracle Morning by Hal Elrod

    95% of people will never create/live the life they dream of, so we must commit to living differently and learning from others’ mistakes.

  • The Miracle Morning by Hal Elrod

    Common causes of mediocrity include rearview mirror syndrome (the need to base every choice off of past experience; don’t tie your future to your past), lack of purpose, isolating incidents (assuming choices only affect the present, forgetting that they also continue to affect the future), lack of accountability (accountability to someone else; get an accountability partner), mediocre circle of influence (who you spend your time with may be the single most determining factor in your success), lack of personal development, and lack of urgency (the belief that personal development can always be left to tomorrow).

  • The Miracle Morning by Hal Elrod

    When you wake up, you need to have a purpose greater than simply to get out of bed. And you have to know what that purpose is to be different.

  • The Miracle Morning by Hal Elrod

    Life SAVERS: Silence (eg. meditation, prayer, reflection, deep breathing, gratitude), Affirmations (your self-talk dramatically influences your level of success; write your own affirmation describing what you want, why you want it, whom you are committed to being to create it, what you’re committed to doing to attain it, and inspirational quotes and philosophies; make sure you tap into your emotions when reciting affirmations), Visualization (relax and get ready to focus, visualize what you really want using all of your senses, and visualize who you need to be and what you need to do; a vision board may help complement this process), Exercise, Reading, and Scribing (journal, and then re-read your entire journal during your annual review, making notes of what you accomplished and lessons learned).

  • 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami

    This may be the most important proposition revealed by history: “At the time, no one knew what was coming.”

  • 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami

    It was odd for him to be screening other writers’ works when he himself was competing for the prize, but he read everything impartially, not terribly concerned about the delicacy of his situation.

  • 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami

    Sex with a married woman ten years his senior was stress free and fulfilling, because it couldn’t lead to anything.

  • 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami

    Once you start lying to the public, you have to keep lying. It never ends. It’s not easy, either psychologically or practically, to keep tweaking the truth to make it all fit together. If one person who’s in on the plan makes one little slip, everybody could be done for.

  • 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami

    “I don’t get it,” Tengo said. “You’d think they’d take special care of a kid with asthma, not bully her.”

    “It’s never that simple in the kids’ world,” she said with a sigh. “Kids get shut out just for being different from everyone else. The same kind of thing goes on in the grown-up world, but it’s much more direct in the children’s world.”

  • 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami

    If you never noticed, it never happened. I mean, the whole point of bullying is to make the person notice it’s being done to him or her. You can’t have bullying without the victim noticing.

  • 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami

    “Finally,” his girlfriend said, “everybody feels safe belonging not to the excluded minority but to the excluding majority. You think, Oh, I’m glad that’s not me. It’s basically the same in all periods in all societies. If you belong to the majority, you can avoid thinking about lots of troubling things.”

  • 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami

    She just didn’t like young men. They were so aggressive and self-confident, but they had nothing to talk about, and whatever they had to say was boring. In bed, they went at it like animals and had no clue about the true enjoyment of sex.

  • 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami

    Something’s wrong with the world, or something’s wrong with me: one or the other. The bottle and the cap don’t fit: is the problem with the bottle or the cap?

  • 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami

    You know, a prostitute is somebody who agrees on a price and gets her money before having sex. The first rule is ‘Pay me before you take your pants off.’ She couldn’t make a living if guys told her, ‘Gee, I don’t have any money’ after it was all over. But when there’s no prior negotiation of a price, and afterward the guy gives you a little something for ‘taxi fare,’ it’s just an expression of gratitude. That’s different from professional prostitution.

  • 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami

    “Is there anything you are afraid of?”

    “Of course there is,” Aomame said. “The thing I’m most afraid of is me. Of not knowing what I’m going to do. Of not knowing what I’m doing right now.”

    “What are you doing right now?”

    Aomame stared at the wineglass in her hand for a time. “I wish I knew.” She looked up. “But I don’t. I can’t even be sure what world I’m in now, what year I’m in.”

    “It’s 1984. We’re in Tokyo, in Japan.”

    “I wish I could declare that with such certainty.”

    “You’re strange,” Ayumi said with a smile. “They’re just self-evident truths. ‘Declaring’ and ‘certainty’ are beside the point.”

    “I can’t explain it very well, but I can’t say they’re self-evident truths to me.”

    “You can’t?” Ayumi said as if deeply impressed. “I’m not quite sure what you’re talking about, but I will say this: whatever time and place this might be, you do have one person you love deeply, and that’s something I can only envy. I don’t have anybody like that.”

    Aomame set her wineglass down on the table and dabbed at her mouth with her napkin. Then she said, “You may be right. Whatever time and place this might be, totally unrelated to that, I want to see him. I want to see him so badly I could die. That’s the only thing that seems certain. It’s the only thing I can say with confidence.”

  • 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami

    A person’s last moments are an important thing. You can’t choose how you’re born, but you can choose how you die.

  • 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami

    I can bear any pain as long as it has meaning.

  • 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami

    “Wherever there’s hope there’s a trial. You’re exactly right. Absolutely. Hope, however, is limited, and generally abstract, while there are countless trials, and they tend to be concrete.”

  • 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami

    Nobody’s easier to fool, Ushikawa thought, than the person who is convinced that he is right.

  • Still Alice by Lisa Genova

    Alice watched her husband and son, both biologists, absorbed in analytical conversation, each trying to impress the other with what he knew.

  • Still Alice by Lisa Genova

    She’d rather die than lose her mind. She looked up at John, his eyes patient, waiting for an answer. How could she tell him she had Alzheimer’s disease? He loved her mind. How could he love her with this? She looked back at Anne’s name carved in stone. “I’m just having a really bad day.” She’d rather die than tell him.

  • Still Alice by Lisa Genova

    “I knew,” said Lydia. “Not that she had Alzheimer’s, but that something was wrong.”

    “How?” asked Anna.

    “Like sometimes she doesn’t make any sense on the phone, and she repeats herself a lot. Or she doesn’t remember something I said five minutes ago. And she didn’t remember how to make the pudding at Christmas.”

    “How long have you noticed this?” asked John.

    “At least a year now.”

    Alice couldn’t trace it quite that far back herself, but she believed her. And she sensed John’s humiliation.

  • Still Alice by Lisa Genova

    She was making mistakes and struggling to compensate for them, but she felt sure that her IQ still fell at least a standard deviation above the mean. And people with average IQs didn’t kill themselves. Well, some did, but not for reasons having to do with IQ.

  • Still Alice by Lisa Genova

    “Mom, what does it feel like?”

    “What does what feel like?”

    “Having Alzheimer’s. Can you feel that you have it right now?”

    “Well, I know I’m not confused or repeating myself right now, but just a few minutes ago, I couldn’t find ‘cream cheese,’ and I was having a hard time participating in the conversation with you and your dad. I know it’s only a matter of time before those types of things happen again, and the times between when it happens are getting shorter. And the things that are happening are getting bigger. So even when I feel completely normal, I know I’m not. It’s not over, it’s just a rest. I don’t trust myself.” As soon as she finished, she worried she’d admitted too much. She didn’t want to scare her daughter. But Lydia didn’t flinch and stayed interested, and Alice relaxed.

    “So you know when it’s happening?”

    “Most of the time.”

    “Like what was happening when you couldn’t think of the name for cream cheese?”

    “I know what I’m looking for, my brain just can’t get to it. It’s like if you decided you wanted that glass of water, only your hand won’t pick it up. You ask it nicely, you threaten it, but it just won’t budge. You might finally get it to move, but then you grab the saltshaker instead, or you knock the glass and spill the water all over the table. Or by the time you get your hand to hold the glass and bring it to your lips, the itch in your throat has cleared, and you don’t need a drink anymore. The moment of need has passed.”

    “That sounds like torture, Mom.”

    “It is.”

    “I’m so sorry you have this.”

    “Thanks.”

    Lydia reached out across the dishes and glasses and years of distance and held her mother’s hand. Alice squeezed it and smiled. Finally, they’d found something else they could talk about.

  • Still Alice by Lisa Genova

    Auditory and visual hallucinations were realities for about half of people with Alzheimer’s disease, but so far she hadn’t experienced any. Or maybe she had.

  • Still Alice by Lisa Genova

    “In case I forget, know that I love you.”

    “I love you, too, Mom.”

  • Still Alice by Lisa Genova

    “I don’t think I can do it, Alice. I’m sorry, I just don’t think I can take being home for a whole year, just sitting and watching what this disease is stealing from you. I can’t take watching you not knowing how to get dressed and not knowing how to work the television. If I’m in lab, I don’t have to watch you sticking Post-it notes on all the cabinets and doors. I can’t just stay home and watch you get worse. It kills me.”

    “No, John, it’s killing me, not you. I’m getting worse, whether you’re home looking at me or hiding in your lab. You’re losing me. I’m losing me. But if you don’t take next year off with me, well, then, we lost you first. I have Alzheimer’s. What’s your fucking excuse?”

  • Still Alice by Lisa Genova

    “I miss myself.”

    “I miss you, too, Ali, so much.”

    “I never planned to get like this.”

    “I know.”

  • Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates

    But race is the child of racism, not the father. And the process of naming “the people” has never been a matter of genealogy and physiognomy so much as one of hierarchy. Difference in hue and hair is old. But the belief in the preeminence of hue and hair, the notion that these factors can correctly organize a society and that they signify deeper attributes, which are indelible—this is the new idea at the heart of these new people who have been brought up hopelessly, tragically, deceitfully, to believe that they are white.

  • Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates

    And you know now, if you did not before, that the police departments of your country have been endowed with the authority to destroy your body. It does not matter if the destruction is the result of an unfortunate overreaction. It does not matter if it originates in a misunderstanding. It does not matter if the destruction springs from a foolish policy. Sell cigarettes without the proper authority and your body can be destroyed. Resent the people trying to entrap your body and it can be destroyed. Turn into a dark stairwell and your body can be destroyed. The destroyers will rarely be held accountable. Mostly they will receive pensions.

  • Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates

    I was eleven years old, standing out in the parking lot in front of the 7-Eleven, watching a crew of older boys standing near the street. They yelled and gestured at…who?…another boy, young, like me, who stood there, almost smiling, gamely throwing up his hands. He had already learned the lesson he would teach me that day: that his body was in constant jeopardy. Who knows what brought him to that knowledge? The projects, a drunken stepfather, an older brother concussed by police, a cousin pinned in the city jail. That he was outnumbered did not matter because the whole world had outnumbered him long ago, and what do numbers matter? This was a war for the possession of his body and that would be the war of his whole life.

  • Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates

    I came to see the streets and the schools as arms of the same beast. One enjoyed the official power of the state while the other enjoyed its implicit sanction. But fear and violence were the weaponry of both. Fail in the streets and the crews would catch you slipping and take your body. Fail in the schools and you would be suspended and sent back to those same streets, where they would take your body. And I began to see these two arms in relation—those who failed in the schools justified their destruction in the streets. The society could say, “He should have stayed in school,” and then wash its hands of him.

  • Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates

    It was a mix of shame for having gone back to the law of the streets mixed with rage—“I could have you arrested!” Which is to say: “I could take your body.”

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