Week 51

Here are some highlights for leading into Week 51 🙂 Sorry I didn’t get around to posting readings for Week 50… …I’ve included more content than usual in this one 🙂

  • The Year of Living Biblically by A.J. Jacobs

    In college I also learned about the theory of cognitive dissonance. This says, in part, if you behave in a certain way, your beliefs will eventually change to conform to your behaviour.

  • The Year of Living Biblically by A.J. Jacobs

    In fact, some say it’s more crucial to follow the inexplicable ones, because it shows you’re committed, that you have great faith. The notion of obeying laws that have no rational explanation is a jarring one. For most of my life, I’ve been working under the paradigm that my behavior should, ideally, have a logical basis. But if you live biblically, this is not true. I have to adjust my brain to this.

  • The Year of Living Biblically by A.J. Jacobs

    The problem is, a lot of religion is about surrendering control and being open to radical change.

  • The Year of Living Biblically by A.J. Jacobs

    “He who spares the rod hates his son, but he who loves him is diligent to discipline him.” –PROVERBS 13:24

  • The Year of Living Biblically by A.J. Jacobs

    Bertrand Russell—the famously agnostic philosopher—said there are two kinds of work in this world: altering the position of matter on earth, and telling other people to alter the position of matter on earth.

  • The Year of Living Biblically by A.J. Jacobs

    My guide, Gershon, is a friend of a friend. He’s a kind, bespectacled, newlywed Hasid whose outgoing voice-mail message says: “Your next action could change the world, so make it a good one.”

  • Alive by Piers Paul Read

    If anything, the experience had made him less religious; he now had a stronger belief in man.

  • The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin by Benjamin Franklin

    If you wish information and improvement from the knowledge of others, and yet at the same time express yourself as firmly fix’d in your present opinions, modest, sensible men, who do not love disputation, will probably leave you undisturbed in the possession of your error. And by such a manner, you can seldom hope to recommend yourself in pleasing your hearers, or to persuade those whose concurrence you desire.

  • The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin by Benjamin Franklin

    Hitherto I had stuck to my resolution of not eating animal food, and on this occasion consider’d, with my master Tryon, the taking every fish as a kind of unprovoked murder, since none of them had, or ever could do us any injury that might justify the slaughter. All this seemed very reasonable. But I had formerly been a great lover of fish, and, when this came hot out of the frying-pan, it smelt admirably well. I balanc’d some time between principle and inclination, till I recollected that, when the fish were opened, I saw smaller fish taken out of their stomachs; then thought I, “If you eat one another, I don’t see why we mayn’t eat you.” So I din’d upon cod very heartily, and continued to eat with other people, returning only now and then occasionally to a vegetable diet. So convenient a thing it is to be a reasonable creature, since it enables one to find or make a reason for everything one has a mind to do.

  • The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin by Benjamin Franklin

    “Seest thou a man diligent in his calling, he shall stand before kings, he shall not stand before mean men,”

  • The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin by Benjamin Franklin

    These names of virtues, with their precepts, were: 1. TEMPERANCE. Eat not to dullness; drink not to elevation. 2. SILENCE. Speak not but what may benefit others or yourself; avoid trifling conversation. 3. ORDER. Let all your things have their places; let each part of your business have its time. 4. RESOLUTION. Resolve to perform what you ought; perform without fail what you resolve. 5. FRUGALITY. Make no expense but to do good to others or yourself; i.e., waste nothing. 6. INDUSTRY. Lose no time; be always employ’d in something useful; cut off all unnecessary actions. 7. SINCERITY. Use no hurtful deceit; think innocently and justly, and, if you speak, speak accordingly. 8. JUSTICE. Wrong none by doing injuries, or omitting the benefits that are your duty. 9. MODERATION. Avoid extreams; forbear resenting injuries so much as you think they deserve. 10. CLEANLINESS. Tolerate no uncleanliness in body, cloaths, or habitation. 11. TRANQUILLITY. Be not disturbed at trifles, or at accidents common or unavoidable. 12. CHASTITY. Rarely use venery but for health or offspring, never to dulness, weakness, or the injury of your own or another’s peace or reputation. 13. HUMILITY. Imitate Jesus and Socrates.

    I determined to give a week’s strict attention to each of the virtues successively. Thus, in the first week, my great guard was to avoid every the least offence against Temperance, leaving the other virtues to their ordinary chance, only marking every evening the faults of the day. Thus, if in the first week I could keep my first line, marked T, clear of spots, I suppos’d the habit of that virtue so much strengthen’d and its opposite weaken’d, that I might venture extending my attention to include the next, and for the following week keep both lines clear of spots. Proceeding thus to the last, I could go thro’ a course compleat in thirteen weeks, and four courses in a year.

    I enter’d upon the execution of this plan for self-examination, and continu’d it with occasional intermissions for some time. I was surpris’d to find myself so much fuller of faults than I had imagined; but I had the satisfaction of seeing them diminish.

  • The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin by Benjamin Franklin

    In reality, there is, perhaps, no one of our natural passions so hard to subdue as pride. Disguise it, struggle with it, beat it down, stifle it, mortify it as much as one pleases, it is still alive, and will every now and then peep out and show itself; you will see it, perhaps, often in this history; for, even if I could conceive that I had compleatly overcome it, I should probably be proud of my humility.

  • The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin by Benjamin Franklin

    This is another instance of the truth of an old maxim I had learned, which says, “He that has once done you a kindness will be more ready to do you another, than he whom you yourself have obliged.” And it shows how much more profitable it is prudently to remove, than to resent, return, and continue inimical proceedings.

  • The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin by Benjamin Franklin

    Human felicity is produc’d not so much by great pieces of good fortune that seldom happen, as by little advantages that occur every day. Thus, if you teach a poor young man to shave himself, and keep his razor in order, you may contribute more to the happiness of his life than in giving him a thousand guineas. The money may be soon spent, the regret only remaining of having foolishly consumed it; but in the other case, he escapes the frequent vexation of waiting for barbers, and of their sometimes dirty fingers, offensive breaths, and dull razors; he shaves when most convenient to him, and enjoys daily the pleasure of its being done with a good instrument.

  • Bossypants by Tina Fey

    In most cases being a good boss means hiring talented people and then getting out of their way.

  • Bossypants by Tina Fey

    But I think the first real change in women’s body image came when JLo turned it butt-style. That was the first time that having a large-scale situation in the back was part of mainstream American beauty. Girls wanted butts now. Men were free to admit that they had always enjoyed them. And then, what felt like moments later, boom—Beyoncé brought the leg meat. A back porch and thick muscular legs were now widely admired. And from that day forward, women embraced their diversity and realized that all shapes and sizes are beautiful. Ah ha ha. No. I’m totally messing with you. All Beyoncé and JLo have done is add to the laundry list of attributes women must have to qualify as beautiful. Now every girl is expected to have:
    Caucasian blue eyes
    full Spanish lips
    a classic button nose
    hairless Asian skin with a California tan
    a Jamaican dance hall ass
    long Swedish legs
    small Japanese feet
    the abs of a lesbian gym owner
    the hips of a nine-year-old boy
    the arms of Michelle Obama
    and doll tits

  • Bossypants by Tina Fey

    In my experience, the hardest thing about having someone “come out” to you is the “pretending to be surprised” part.

  • Bossypants by Tina Fey

    I’m a working parent and I understand that sometimes you want to have a very productive Saturday to feel that you are in control of your life, which of course you are not.

  • Bossypants by Tina Fey

    If you retain nothing else, always remember the most important Rule of Beauty. “Who cares?”

  • Bossypants by Tina Fey

    The show doesn’t go on because it’s ready; it goes on because it’s 11:30.

  • Bossypants by Tina Fey

    You have to try your hardest to be at the top of your game and improve every joke you can until the last possible second, and then you have to let it go.

  • Bossypants by Tina Fey

    I feel about Photoshop the way some people feel about abortion. It is appalling and a tragic reflection on the moral decay of our society… unless I need it, in which case, everybody be cool.

  • Bossypants by Tina Fey

    Gwen Ifill: Governor Palin, would you extend same-sex rights to the entire country?

    Gov. Sarah Palin: You know, I would be afraid of where that would lead. I believe marriage is meant to be a sacred institution between two unwilling teenagers.

  • Bossypants by Tina Fey

    I’ve known older men in comedy who can barely feed and clean themselves, and they still work. The women, though, they’re all “crazy.” I have a suspicion—and hear me out, ’cause this is a rough one—I have a suspicion that the definition of “crazy” in show business is a woman who keeps talking even after no one wants to fuck her anymore. The only person I can think of that has escaped the “crazy” moniker is Betty White, which, obviously, is because people still want to have sex with her.

  • When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

    My back stiffened terribly during the flight, and by the time I made it to Grand Central to catch a train to my friends’ place upstate, my body was rippling with pain. Over the past few months, I’d had back spasms of varying ferocity, from simple ignorable pain, to pain that made me forsake speech to grind my teeth, to pain so severe I curled up on the floor, screaming. This pain was toward the more severe end of the spectrum. I lay down on a hard bench in the waiting area, feeling my back muscles contort, breathing to control the pain—the ibuprofen wasn’t touching this—and naming each muscle as it spasmed to stave off tears: erector spinae, rhomboid, latissimus, piriformis… A security guard approached. “Sir, you can’t lie down here.” “I’m sorry,” I said, gasping out the words. “Bad…back…spasms.” “You still can’t lie down here.” I’m sorry, but I’m dying from cancer. The words lingered on my tongue—but what if I wasn’t? Maybe this was just what people with back pain live with. I knew a lot about back pain—its anatomy, its physiology, the different words patients used to describe different kinds of pain—but I didn’t know what it felt like. Maybe that’s all this was. Maybe. Or maybe I didn’t want the jinx. Maybe I just didn’t want to say the word cancer out loud. I pulled myself up and hobbled to the platform.

  • When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

    Nabokov, for his awareness of how our suffering can make us callous to the obvious suffering of another.

  • When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

    If the unexamined life was not worth living, was the unlived life worth examining?

  • When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

    There is a moment, a cusp, when the sum of gathered experience is worn down by the details of living. We are never so wise as when we live in this moment.

  • When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

    Only later would I realize that our trip had added a new dimension to my understanding of the fact that brains give rise to our ability to form relationships and make life meaningful. Sometimes, they break.

  • When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

    Because the brain mediates our experience of the world, any neurosurgical problem forces a patient and family, ideally with a doctor as a guide, to answer this question: What makes life meaningful enough to go on living?

  • When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

    Not all residents could stand the pressure. One was simply unable to accept blame or responsibility. He was a talented surgeon, but he could not admit when he’d made a mistake. I sat with him one day in the lounge as he begged me to help him save his career. “All you have to do,” I said, “is look me in the eye and say, ‘I’m sorry. What happened was my fault, and I won’t let it happen again.’ ” “But it was the nurse who—” “No. You have to be able to say it and mean it. Try again.” “But—” “No. Say it.” This went on for an hour before I knew he was doomed.

  • When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

    Rushing a patient to the OR to save only enough brain that his heart beats but he can never speak, he eats through a tube, and he is condemned to an existence he would never want…I came to see this as a more egregious failure than the patient dying/

  • When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

    When there’s no place for the scalpel, words are the surgeon’s only tool.

  • When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

    The families who gather around their beloved—their beloved whose sheared heads contained battered brains—do not usually recognize the full significance, either. They see the past, the accumulation of memories, the freshly felt love, all represented by the body before them. I see the possible futures, the breathing machines connected through a surgical opening in the neck, the pasty liquid dripping in through a hole in the belly, the possible long, painful, and only partial recovery—or, sometimes more likely, no return at all of the person they remember. In these moments, I acted not, as I most often did, as death’s enemy, but as its ambassador.

  • When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

    Most lives are lived with passivity toward death—it’s something that happens to you and those around you.

  • When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

    Before my cancer was diagnosed, I knew that someday I would die, but I didn’t know when. After the diagnosis, I knew that someday I would die, but I didn’t know when. But now I knew it acutely. The problem wasn’t really a scientific one. The fact of death is unsettling. Yet there is no other way to live.

  • When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

    “Will having a newborn distract from the time we have together?” she asked. “Don’t you think saying goodbye to your child will make your death more painful?” “Wouldn’t it be great if it did?” I said. Lucy and I both felt that life wasn’t about avoiding suffering.

  • When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

    The tricky part of illness is that, as you go through it, your values are constantly changing. You try to figure out what matters to you, and then you keep figuring it out. It felt like someone had taken away my credit card and I was having to learn how to budget. You may decide you want to spend your time working as a neurosurgeon, but two months later, you may feel differently. Two months after that, you may want to learn to play the saxophone or devote yourself to the church. Death may be a one-time event, but living with terminal illness is a process.

  • When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

    Not only that, but maybe the basic message of original sin isn’t “Feel guilty all the time.” Maybe it is more along these lines: “We all have a notion of what it means to be good, and we can’t live up to it all the time.” Maybe that’s what the message of the New Testament is, after all. Even if you have a notion as well defined as Leviticus, you can’t live that way. It’s not just impossible, it’s insane.

  • The Reason You Walk by Wab Kinew

    My community, my family, and my father responded by giving me a second chance. That which was broken, they tried to make whole again.

  • The Reason You Walk by Wab Kinew

    “I want to take my own life,” Tootons said. “But I don’t have the heart to shoot myself in the head. So I use this bottle instead.” Tobasonakwut never gave up on his brother, despite the fact that he drank until the end of his life.

  • The Reason You Walk by Wab Kinew

    On the long drive back home, I wondered why Ndede refused to stick up for me when a grown man had attacked me but had been so harsh when I didn’t attack another child who had hurt me by accident. At the time, I did not know that he had grown up in a dog-eat-dog environment with no one to stick up for him. All I knew was that he was an angry, angry man.

  • The Reason You Walk by Wab Kinew

    That night, Ndede smiled as we sat beside a campfire. “One of the other chiefs was looking at you while you were piercing,” he said. “You didn’t make a face when they cut you.” Then a pause. “No brain, no pain,” he teased. The words echoed in my head as the dark South Dakota night enveloped us. In years to come, many family members would join us in that place, sitting around campfires like that one. But that night, it was just Ndede and me. Me and my dad. And I knew that he was proud.

  • The Reason You Walk by Wab Kinew

    While I was trying to explain the CBC’s position to one of these people who was skeptical of the apology, an all-staff notice came across my computer screen and changed my optimism. The memo said that those who went to residential schools liked to call themselves “survivors” but that this term was technically incorrect, and it offered a dictionary definition of the term as supposed proof. “Survivors,” the definition went, were persons, plants, or animals that outlasted disasters that killed others of their kind. In our coverage, we were to avoid saying “survivors” and use the government’s chosen term: “former students.”

    In some areas, nearly half of the kids who were sent to residential schools died there.

  • The Reason You Walk by Wab Kinew

    When I was about to leave, my father offered me some advice based on his years as a politician. “You know,” he said, “when you’re in a situation like this, you can’t aim to humiliate your opponent. You have to give them a way out, you have to give them a way to save face and feel like they are doing the right thing.”

  • The Reason You Walk by Wab Kinew

    Back in the CBC Winnipeg newsroom, I could see the stress of the day wearing on my colleagues. They were reporting and sharing one brutal story after another told by residential school survivors, and it was taking its toll. “I can’t fucking take this!” a non-Native colleague yelled as he threw his headphones at his desk. He brought his hands to his face. Tears welled in his eyes. I put my hand on his shoulder. I told him it was going to be all right.

  • The Reason You Walk by Wab Kinew

    Remember the 2009 H1N1 influenza scare? Manitoba First Nations were hit hard by the disease. Rather than sending enough Tamiflu to treat the residents of Indigenous communities, Health Canada sent body bags. Whoever made that decision did not see the people on those reserves the same way they see other human beings. These daily injustices may seem tiny in the grand scheme of things, but they add up. They misinform the public and feed into stereotypes about Indigenous peoples.

  • The Reason You Walk by Wab Kinew

    We have a choice in life—we can choose how we are going to behave. We can determine whether we reflect the good around us or lose ourselves in the darkness.

  • The Reason You Walk by Wab Kinew

    I told my mother I loved her, “Kiizhawaynimin Nimaamaa,” as I hugged and kissed her. Then I walked to my father, seated beside the campfire. “Kiizhawaynimin Ndede.” I leaned down to hug him. He was smaller than before. Something tugged at the corners of my mouth. I thought of those times we had not expressed our love for one another. The times we had not hugged each other or told one another how we felt. What a waste. I kissed him on the head, patted him softly on the back, and went to bed.

  • The Reason You Walk by Wab Kinew

    There is a Lakota adage that the chief should be the poorest member in his community. He should be poor because he gives everything away to help his people. We chiefs honour this belief by putting ourselves last at the ceremony, allowing all the others to finish their prayers ahead of us.

  • The Reason You Walk by Wab Kinew

    Nerves. Best not to dwell on these feelings, I reminded myself. I learned long ago at the sundance that if something frightens you, it is best to walk straight toward it and get it over with.

  • The Reason You Walk by Wab Kinew

    “I do not have much time left in this world,” he reminded us. “I can’t be angry. I don’t want to spend the rest of my time here being angry. I have to make things right. Not for those other people, but for me. I want to leave this world in a good way. So I am making things right with the Church.” And that was that.

  • The Reason You Walk by Wab Kinew

    Our ancestors said that in life we need both the young and the old—the old because they pull us onward in life, the young because they push us forward. For a moment, I stood in the middle as the older and younger generations acted on me from both directions.

  • The Reason You Walk by Wab Kinew

    We had witnessed what Søren Kierkegaard called a levelling process. The divisions we obsess over—money, politics, race—were stripped away first. They did not matter in the end. Then the travelling was taken away, followed by the independence of the individual, the ego. They did not matter either. Then you got down to what really mattered. Food. But then you can’t eat. Water. But then you can’t drink. Air. But then you stop breathing. Finally, all he had left was the final resource that all of us will exhaust—time. But then his time was up. And then he was gone. What’s left behind? All that remains in the end is love. The love he had for us. The love we still have for him. And true love never dies.

  • The Reason You Walk by Wab Kinew

    The underlying message of my father’s life, and especially his final year, is one that wise women and men have known for millennia: when we are wronged it is better to respond with love, courage, and grace than with anger, bitterness, and rage. We are made whole by living up to the best part of human nature—the part willing to forgive the aggressor, the part that never loses sight of the humanity of those on the other side of the relationship, and the part that embraces the person with whom we have every right to be angry and accepts him or her as a brother or sister.

  • The Reason You Walk by Wab Kinew

    We ought to recognize that our greatest battle is not with one another but with our pain, our problems, and our flaws. To be hurt, yet forgive. To do wrong, but forgive yourself. To depart from this world leaving only love. This is the reason you walk.

  • Shoe Dog by Phil Knight

    “In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities, but in the expert’s mind there are few.” –Shunryu Suzuki, Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind

  • Shoe Dog by Phil Knight

    When you run around an oval track, or down an empty road, you have no real destination. At least, none that can fully justify the effort. The act itself becomes the destination. It’s not just that there’s no finish line; it’s that you define the finish line. Whatever pleasures or gains you derive from the act of running, you must find them within. It’s all in how you frame it, how you sell it to yourself.

  • Shoe Dog by Phil Knight

    I went for long runs, musing on every detail while racing the wild geese as they flew overhead. Their tight V formations—I’d read somewhere that the geese in the rear of the formation, cruising in the backdraft, only have to work 80 percent as hard as the leaders. Every runner understands this. Front runners always work the hardest, and risk the most.

  • Shoe Dog by Phil Knight

    It was my first real awareness that not everyone in this world will like us, or accept us, that we’re often cast aside at the very moment we most need to be included.

  • Shoe Dog by Phil Knight

    Love truth, but pardon error.

  • Shoe Dog by Phil Knight

    Until the shoes arrived, whether or not the shoes ever arrived, I’d need to find some way to earn cash money.

  • Shoe Dog by Phil Knight

    The man who moves a mountain begins by carrying away small stones.

  • Shoe Dog by Phil Knight

    Bowerman’s strategy for running the mile was simple. Set a fast pace for the first two laps, run the third as hard as you can, then triple your speed on the fourth. There was a Zen-like quality to this strategy, because it was impossible. And yet it worked. Bowerman coached more sub-four-minute milers than anybody, ever.

  • Shoe Dog by Phil Knight

    Perhaps nothing ever revealed my mother’s true nature like the frequent drills she put me through. As a young girl she’d witnessed a house in her neighborhood burn to the ground; one of the people inside had been killed. So she often tied a rope to the post of my bed and made me use it to rappel out of my second-floor window. While she timed me. What must the neighbors have thought? What must I have thought? Probably this: Life is dangerous. And this: We must always be prepared. And this: My mother loves me.

  • Shoe Dog by Phil Knight

    The art of competing, I’d learned from track, was the art of forgetting, and I now reminded myself of that fact. You must forget your limits. You must forget your doubts, your pain, your past. You must forget that internal voice screaming, begging, “Not one more step!” And when it’s not possible to forget it, you must negotiate with it.

  • Shoe Dog by Phil Knight

    “It’s like Hesse says,” she purred over dinner one night, “happiness is a how, not a what.”

  • Shoe Dog by Phil Knight

    Someone somewhere once said that business is war without bullets, and I tended to agree.

  • Shoe Dog by Phil Knight

    But my hope was that when I failed, if I failed, I’d fail quickly, so I’d have enough time, enough years, to implement all the hard-won lessons. I wasn’t much for setting goals, but this goal kept flashing through my mind every day, until it became my internal chant: Fail fast.

  • Shoe Dog by Phil Knight

    The single easiest way to find out how you feel about someone. Say goodbye.

  • Shoe Dog by Phil Knight

    I told myself: Life is growth. You grow or you die.

  • Shoe Dog by Phil Knight

    You are remembered for the rules you break.

  • Shoe Dog by Phil Knight

    “Here comes the wall,” she’d say, exasperated, and a little frightened. I should have told her, That’s what men do when they fight. They put up walls. They pull up the drawbridge. They fill in the moat.

  • Shoe Dog by Phil Knight

    I didn’t understand what was happening, in the moment, but now I do. The years of stress were taking their toll. When you see only problems, you’re not seeing clearly. At just the moment I needed to be my sharpest, I was approaching burnout.

  • Shoe Dog by Phil Knight

    The cowards never started and the weak died along the way. That leaves us, ladies and gentlemen. Us.

  • Shoe Dog by Phil Knight

    I’d like to warn the best of them, the iconoclasts, the innovators, the rebels, that they will always have a bull’s-eye on their backs. The better they get, the bigger the bull’s-eye. It’s not one man’s opinion; it’s a law of nature.

  • Shoe Dog by Phil Knight

    Sometimes you have to give up. Sometimes knowing when to give up, when to try something else, is genius. Giving up doesn’t mean stopping. Don’t ever stop.

  • Shoe Dog by Phil Knight

    Hard work is critical, a good team is essential, brains and determination are invaluable, but luck may decide the outcome.

  • I Am Malala by Malala Yousafzai

    His men stopped health workers giving polio drops, saying the vaccinations were an American plot to make Muslim women infertile so that the people of Swat would die out.

  • I Am Malala by Malala Yousafzai

    Meanwhile the authorities, like most people, did nothing.

  • I Am Malala by Malala Yousafzai

    The truth will abolish fear.

  • I Am Malala by Malala Yousafzai

    In his pocket he kept a poem written by Martin Niemöller, who had lived in Nazi Germany. First they came for the communists, and I didn’t speak out because I wasn’t a communist. Then they came for the socialists, and I didn’t speak out because I wasn’t a socialist. Then they came for the trade unionists, and I didn’t speak out because I wasn’t a trade unionist. Then they came for the Jews, and I didn’t speak out because I was not a Jew. Then they came for the Catholics, and I didn’t speak out because I was not a Catholic. Then they came for me, and there was no one left to speak for me. I knew he was right. If people were silent, nothing would change.

  • I Am Malala by Malala Yousafzai

    “It is my belief God sends the solution first and the problem later,” replied Dr. Javid.

  • I Am Malala by Malala Yousafzai

    I used to be known as his daughter; now he’s known as my father.

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