Week 45

Here are some highlights for leading into Week 45 🙂

  • “Engineering growth: assessing progress” by Jamie Talbot

    Overall, if it is not Clear that an engineer is at a given milestone, they are at the previous milestone.

  • “A Study Used Sensors to Show That Men and Women Are Treated Differently at Work” by Stephen Turban, Laura Freeman, and Ben Waber

    Women had the same number of contacts as men, they spent as much time with senior leadership, and they allocated their time similarly to men in the same role. We couldn’t see the types of projects they were working on, but we found that men and women had indistinguishable work patterns in the amount of time they spent online, in concentrated work, and in face-to-face conversation. And in performance evaluations men and women received statistically identical scores. This held true for women at each level of seniority. Yet women weren’t advancing and men were.

    This indicates that arguments about changing women’s behavior — to “lean-in,” for example — might miss the bigger picture: Gender inequality is due to bias, not differences in behavior.

  • “A Study Used Sensors to Show That Men and Women Are Treated Differently at Work” by Stephen Turban, Laura Freeman, and Ben Waber

    This means trying bias-reduction programs, but also developing policies that explicitly level the playing field. One way to do so is to make promotions and hiring more equal. Significant research suggests that mandating a diverse slate of candidates helps companies make better decisions.

  • “How to Get to the Core by Asking the Right Questions” by Tom Bartel

    Either they can’t, or they won’t. It is your job as a manager to find out which of the two it is.

    Asking the right questions is the crucial skill that allows you to do this. Out of all questions, why is one of the most important and powerful ones.

  • “How to Get to the Core by Asking the Right Questions” by Tom Bartel

    If you want real commitment to a solution strategy, this solution should not come only from you, but also from your employee. If you have clearly identified the root cause of the problem, it should not be too difficult to invent an effective solution strategy.

  • How Emotions Are Made by Lisa Feldman Barrett

    Now imagine that you’re in a doctors office, complaining of chest pressure and shortness of breath, which may be a heart attack symptoms. If you’re a woman, you’re more likely to be diagnosed with anxiety and sent home, whereas if you’re a man, you’re more likely to be diagnosed with heart disease and receive lifesaving preventive treatment. As a result, women over age 65 die more frequently of heart attacks that men do. The perceptions of doctors, nurses, and the female patients themselves are shaped by classical view believes that they can detect emotions like anxiety, and that women are inherently more emotional than men…with fatal consequences.

  • How Emotions Are Made by Lisa Feldman Barrett

    The same neural process of construction that simulates a bee from blobs also constructs feelings of attraction from a fluttering stomach and a flushing face. An emotion is your brain’s creation of what your bodily sensations mean, in relation to what is going on around you in the world. … I call this explanation the theory of constructed emotion.

  • How Emotions Are Made by Lisa Feldman Barrett

    Emotions are not reactions to the world. You are not a passive receiver of sensory input but an active constructor of your emotions. From sensory input and past experience, your brain constructs meaning and prescribes action. If you didn’t have concepts that represent your past experience, all your sensory inputs would just be noise. You wouldn’t know what the sensations are, what caused them, nor how to behave to deal with them. With concepts, your brain makes meaning of sensation, and sometimes that meaning is an emotion.

  • How Emotions Are Made by Lisa Feldman Barrett

    You might think that your perceptions of the world are driven by events in the world, but really, they are anchored in your predictions, which are then tested against those little skipping stones of incoming sensory input.

    Through prediction and correction, your brain continually creates and revises your mental model of the world. It’s a huge, ongoing simulation that constructs everything you perceive while determining how you act. But predictions aren’t always correct, when compared to actual sensory input, and the brain must make adjustments.

  • How Emotions Are Made by Lisa Feldman Barrett

    The world often takes a backseat to your predictions.

  • How Emotions Are Made by Lisa Feldman Barrett

    Interoception is also one of the most important ingredients in what you experience as reality. If you didn’t have interoception, the physical world would be meaningless noise to you. Consider this: Your interceptive predictions, which produce your feelings of affect, determine what you care about in the moment—your affective niche. From the perspective of your brain, anything in your affective niche could potentially influence your body budget, and nothing else in the universe matters. That means, in effect, that you construct the environment in which you live.

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