Week 33

Here are some highlights for leading into Week 33 🙂

  • “8 Proven Performance Practices from Billionaires and Elite Athletes” by Benjamin P. Hardy

    In sports and all other forms of competition, people perform best when the game is close. … But when the contest is decidedly in one opponent’s favor, neither side acts with the same effort.

    Sadly, you probably perceive those at the top of your field “in a different league” altogether. But when you do this, you perform with less intensity than you would if you perceived the “game” to be closer.

  • “8 Proven Performance Practices from Billionaires and Elite Athletes” by Benjamin P. Hardy

    Although his overarching vision remains consistent, Ferriss doesn’t have long-term plans. Instead, he does 3–6 month “experiments,” which he puts all of his energy into. He has no clue what doors may open as a result of these experiments, so why make long-term plans? He’d rather respond to the brilliant and best opportunities that arise, taking him in now unforeseen directions.

    Experiments are a fun way to pursue goals because they allow you to get innovative and bold. Experiments are short-term — and thus relatively low risk — thus, they should be “moon shots.”

  • “How ‘Demo-or-Die’ Helped My Career” by Danah Boyd

    I would argue that what makes “demo-or-die” so powerful has absolutely nothing to do with the production of a demo. It has to do with the act of doing a demo. And that distinction is important because that’s where the skill development that I relish lies.

  • The Law of Success by Napoleon Hill

    You are condemning yourself to poverty, misery and failure, or you are driving yourself on toward the heights of great achievement, solely by the thoughts you think.

  • The Law of Success by Napoleon Hill

    Opportunity may be found wherever one really looks for it, and nowhere else!

  • Thanks for the Feedback by Douglas Stone & Sheila Heen

    When they blame you, and it feels unfair, blaming them back is not the answer. To them, that will seem unfair, and worse, they’ll assume you’re making excuses. Instead, work to understand it this way: “What’s the dynamic between us and what are we each contributing to the problem?”

  • Thanks for the Feedback by Douglas Stone & Sheila Heen

    Feedback givers arrive at their labels in two steps: (1) they observe data, and (2) they interpret that data—they tell a story about what it means. …

    Data is crucial, but so is the interpretation. At the very least, it’s one person’s view of things. So you want to get a clear picture of both data and observation.

  • Thanks for the Feedback by Douglas Stone & Sheila Heen

    A specific and contained piece of feedback steadily turns into an ever more ominous future disaster: “I had mayonnaise on my cheek during the date” becomes “I will die alone.”

  • Thanks for the Feedback by Douglas Stone & Sheila Heen

    Try this exercise: Think of feedback you’ve received in the fast several months, big or small. …
    First assume that the feedback was intended as evaluation. What would the feedback say about you? You’re over permissive? A bad parent?

    Now imagine that the feedback was intended as coaching—something you might learn from. …
    If you run through this sorting exercise a few times, you’ll notice three things. First, you’ll see that with some effort you can hear most feedback either way. Second, if you’re successful in hearing it as a coaching, you’ll notice that your identity reaction is diminished or gone. And third, you’ll start to notice patterns—your own tendencies.

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